Friday, August 11, 2017

Monday, July 31, 2017

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Mother Mary Angelica, RIP

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Mother Mary Angelica, RIP: Mother Angelica , foundress of the Eternal Word Television Network, of two religious orders, and EWTN radio, died Easter Sunday, March 27,...

Friday, July 21, 2017

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: An Ordination in Dachau

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: An Ordination in Dachau: During the English Recusant period the missionary priests had travelled to Rome, Reims, Douai, or Vallidolid for their seminary training a...

Thursday, July 20, 2017

St Kinga | Independent Catholic News

St Kinga | Independent Catholic News: Princess. St Kunigunde or Kinga, was born in 1226 in Hungary. Her family was distinguished for its political power as well as its ho...

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Sts. Justa and Rufina, Roman Catholic Virgins and Martyrs (Feast - July 19)

Sts. Justa and Rufina, Roman Catholic Virgins and Martyrs (Feast - July 19) These martyrs were two Christian women at Seville in Spain who maintained themselves by selling earthenware. Not to concur in idolatrous superstitions, they refused to sell vessels for the use of heathen ceremonies and when the worshipers broke up their stock-in-trade, Justa and Rufina retorted by overthrowing the image of a false goddess. Whereupon the people impeached them for their faith before the governor. The prefect, after they had boldly confessed Christ, commanded them to be stretched on the rack and their sides to be torn with hooks. An idol was placed near the rack with incense, that if they would offer sacrifice they should be released; but their fidelity was not to be shaken. Justa died on the rack; the judge ordered Rufina to be strangled, and their bodies to be burned. Feastday July 19

St Arsenius and St Mary MacKillop | Independent Catholic News

St Arsenius and St Mary MacKillop | Independent Catholic News: Fresco, Mount AthosMonk. Born in Rome, in 354, Arsenius is said to have been a deacon, and later a tutor to the Emperor Theodosi...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Church and State in Colonial British America

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Church and State in Colonial British America: The Eerdman's blog offers an excerpt from Mark A. Noll's book The Old Religion in a New World  about the development of religious ...

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Dialogues des Carmelites final

St Simon Stock | Independent Catholic News

St Simon Stock | Independent Catholic News: This is the patronal feast of the Carmelites. The Order of Carmelites takes its name from Mount Carmel in Israel, which was the firs...

Friday, July 14, 2017

Bl. Richard Langhorne, Roman Catholic lawyer and English Martyr He was hanged at Tyburn, London, on 14 July

Bl. Richard Langhorne, Roman Catholic lawyer and English Martyr He was hanged at Tyburn, London, on 14 July

St Camillus | Independent Catholic News

St Camillus | Independent Catholic News: Patron of nurses and the sick. Born in Naples in 1550, St Camillus was very tall, (six foot six) and, as a young man, hot-tempered a...

The French Revolution: The Rising of the Vendee

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

St Veronica | Independent Catholic News

St Veronica | Independent Catholic News: Traditionally, St Veronica was a woman of Jerusalem who was so filled with compassion when she saw Jesus carrying his cross on the w...

St. John Wall, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr, and imprisoned for five months. He was martyred by being hanged, drawn, and quartered at Redhill. Feastday July12

St. John Wall, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr, and imprisoned for five months. He was martyred by being hanged, drawn, and quartered at Redhill. Feastday July12

Bl. David Gonson, Roman Catholic Knight of St. John and English Martyr . David was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Southwark. Feastday July 12

Bl. David Gonson, Roman Catholic Knight of St. John and English Martyr . David was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Southwark. Feastday July 12

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

The Beginning and Spread of the Catholic Culture by Hilarie Belloc

 
The Beginning and Spread of the Catholic Culture
How was the Faith was established and spread with such astonishing success throughout a vast society which had begun by knowing it ill, had proceeded to hate it, and had at last accepted it for a universal religion.
But what was the internal force? How were men convinced? Why did they join this society in spite of the terrible risks communion with it involved? Often it meant ruin of fortune and thrusting out from the society of one’s fellows and sometimes torture and death. What drove men to it? The answer is that the Church was a person which men came to trust as they come to trust it today. A man became a Christian because he found that the Church affirmed things which he recognized to be true in experience and holy in character.
The Holy Catholic Church and Christian Culture
We must begin by laying down as a historical fact not to be removed by affection one way or the other, that the conversion of the Roman Empire was a conversion to what was called by all our ancestry and what is still called by those with any historical sense The Catholic Church.
The Empire was not ‘converted’ to what modern men mean when they used the word ‘Christianity’.
The phrase is continually used and as continually corrupts the historical judgement of those who use it and those who hear it.
In the ears of modern youth, especially in societies which have lost the Catholic Culture, the word ‘Christianity’ means vaguely, “That which is common in various sects, opinions and moods inherited in diluted form from the Reformation”.
In England today, for instance ‘Christianity’ means a general feeling of kindliness, particularly to animals.
To some more precise in mind it may mean an appreciation of and even an attempt at copying, a Character which seems to them portrayed in the four Gospels (four out of the certainly more than fifty, which four they happened to inherited from the Catholic Church, although they do not know it).
To a much smaller number, with greater powers of definition and better historical instruction, the word ‘Christianity’ may have even so precise a meaning as ‘the acceptance of the doctrine that an historical Figure appeared in Palestine about two thousand years ago, and was in some way the Incarnation of God and that the main precepts, at least, of an original society calling itself after His name should be our guide for moral conduct
But all these uses of the word ‘Christianity’ from the vaguest to the most precise, do not apply the tremendous business with which we are here concerned.
The society of the ancient world was not changed from its antique attitude to that which it finally adopted in the 4th century (and continued thenceforward to spread throughout Europe) by any mod or opinion; it was transformed by adherence to the doctrine and discipline as well as the spirit and character of a certain institution; and that institution is historically known; it is a Personality which can be tested by certain indisputable attributes, practices and definitions.
It claimed and claims Divine authority to teach, to include in its membership by specific form of initiation those who approached it and were found worthy; to exclude those who would not accept that unity and supremacy.
It performed throughout the society of the Empire and even beyond its boundaries a certain liturgical act of sacrifice, the Eucharist, it affirmed its foundation by a Divine figure who was also a man, and a manifestation of God.
It further affirmed that its officers held their authority through appointment originally by this Founder, who gathered a small group for that purpose, it affirmed that from the members of this small original group, in unbroken succession, descended the spiritual powers which could be claimed by officers and by them alone, in particular manner, over the whole body of Christians, and in general fashion over the world at large.
In order to understand this very great thing which captured and transformed the old pagan world, we must grasp its nature. We must be able to answer the question, “what was it that spread so rapidly and so triumphantly throughout the Graeco-Roman world?’
Secondly, we must appreciate the “method’ by which this revolution was accomplished; lastly in order to understand both the nature and the method of the ‘thing’ we must discover why it met with so ‘intense a resistance’, for that resistance explains both its character and its ways of propagation and it was victory over that resistance which established the Catholic Faith and practice so firmly over our race for so many centuries and generations.
First then, as to the nature of the conquest. The great change did not come because ‘it met a need’; it did indeed meet needs that were universal. It filled up that aching void in the soul which was the prime malady of the dying ancient society; also it relieved and dissipated despair, the capital burden imposed by that void.
Yet the meeting of the need was not the essential character of the new ‘thing’; it was not the driving power behind the great change; it was only a result incidental thereof.
It was not merely in order to assuage such needs of the spirit that men turned towards the Catholic Church: had that been so, we should have been able to trace the steps whereby from vague groping and half-satisfied longings there should have crystallized this and that myth, this and that fulfillment of desire by imagination, until the system should have come into being long after the inception of the first influences.
That such a gradual process did take place is commonly affirmed by those who have not a sufficient acquaintance, even on the largest lines with the ‘thing’ historically but in fact nothing of the kind took place. You discover not a vague frame of mind, but a definite society from the first; no criticism of documents or of tradition can prevent any other conclusion.
A man appeared, gathered together a certain company and taught.
And not only so soon ass that company begins to act, but at the root of all memory with regard to its action, you have the specific claim of Divine revelation in the Teacher, of His Human and Divine nature; of His resurrection from the dead; of His establishing a central rite of Sacrifice, which was called the Eucharist (the Act of Gratitude); the claim to authority; the Apostolic organization of the tradition; the presence of a hierarchy and all the rest.
The Catholic Church visible was not an influence that spread; it was a ‘Thing’. It was a fixed Corporation, a Club, if you will; it was an organization with a form and members, a defined outline, and a discipline. Disputes arose within it, certain of its members would overemphasize this or that among the doctrines for which it stood and so warp the proportion of the whole.
But no innovator, even during the first enthusiasm when so many debates surrounded so intellectually vigorous a ‘thing’, would ever pretend that there was not one body to be preserved. He might claim to be the true continuator of that body, and protest (when he was excluded from it for dissent); but never did any of those at the origin propose that discord upon essentials could be permanent
This new and strict corporation had a name, a name associated in the minds of its contemporaries with the idea of a secret society possessed of mysteries; it called itself the Ekklesia.  Now it is all-important to grasp this further fact, that the new Ekklesia with its mysteries, its initiation ceremonies (instruction in doctrine, solemn affirmation thereof, called “confession”, what we call a creed, and Baptism) was not one of many religions which happened to prove the winner in a sort of race. That is an error which one finds in many of the textbooks and which has almost passed into popular acceptance. Any number of our general outlines of history and the rest talk of the Early Church in this fashion.
They say, for instance, that the earlier mysteries such as the mysteries of Eleusis, the latter mysteries of Mithras, and the Egyptian mysteries of Isis, etc. were of this sort and what they call “Christianity” (for they usually avoid the word “Catholic Church”) was but one of many.
This is not true, and the test that it is not true is simple and should be conclusive. The Catholic Church alone and from its origins proclaimed the Divinity of a real historical man and the objective truth of the doctrines which it affirmed. It proclaimed from the beginning the Resurrection of that real historic man from the dead; and the popular nickname “Christian” (which became, like so many nicknames, the general term) arose from that fact.
All the other popular worships with their mysteries and initiations and the rest of it were admittedly ‘myths’. They did not say, “This happened”; what they said was, “This is a parable, a symbol to explain to you the nature and the possible fate of the human soul and its relation to the Divine.
Not one of them said, “I was founded by a real man whom other men met and knew, who lived in a particular place and time, one to whom there a ‘ a cloud of witnesses’”; not one of them said that they held revealed truth  and that their officials held a Divine commission to explain that truth throughout the world.
In all this there was a violent contrast between the Catholic Church and the whole of the pagan world around; neither the intellectuals following Greek traditions nor the Roman Empire with its administrative sense of unity persecuted the other associations. It was not the doctrine of the Resurrection, still less the doctrine of Immortality which was found repulsive; it was the affirmation that the criminal who had been put to death in a known place and time at Jerusalem, under the Emperor Tiberius, condemned to scourging and ignominious capital punishment of Crucifixion, where to no Roman citizen was liable, was Divine, spoke with Divine authority, founded a Divine Society, rose from the dead, and could promise to his faithful followers eternal beatitude. This was what shocked the intellectuals, but this also was what gave stuff and substance to that new society and so led, as we shall see in a moment to persecution.
Now, as to its method of expansion, how did it propagate itself?  What was the machinery which proved so successful that in less than four long lifetimes the whole of that hostile society was officially Catholic and that within another two long lifetimes the whole of the population, West and East, of the known world between the Channel, the Rhine, the Danube and the desert followed its creed and accepted its doctrines?
It worked by the method which we have come to call “Cells,” a word rendered familiar today through the universal Communist agitation. If, as some think, that Communist movement is the final assault upon Catholic tradition and the Faith, if it be, as many think, the modern anti-Christ, the parallel is indeed striking. All over the Graeco-Roman  Empire there were founded rapidly a number of these small organizations, first connected with and later separated from local Jewish synagogues; fixed in the greater towns, but later scattered like seed also in the provincial centers, and then by missionary effort throughout the country sides.
We know this was the method, through ample documentary evidence; we have also a vast mass of tradition, largely legendary, of course, after such length of time, but containing its nucleus of truth, which tells us how in this place and in that these “Cells” were founded and established. Each was called individually a Church, just as the general organization was known as the Church as a whole. They were governed by a Hierarchy. At the head of one church would be one presiding officer, the Episkopos, a word of which we have made the English word “Bishop.”
He was nominated sometimes, apparently by the local clergy, sometimes by the acclamation of the community; but he held his title not from these, but from the Apostolical succession. This and that ancient local Church boasted that it had been founded by an Apostle, and soon in drawing up lists of Bishops the chain was traced to that Apostle who had first begun it by the laying on of hands. Those thus ordained would lay on hands in their turn, and so the hierarchy or body of the clergy was formed. After some indeterminate time not the Bishop alone (who was the full priest), but subordinates bearing the titles of “elders,” in the Greek “presbuteros,” could function at the Holy Mysteries, having been ordained in their turn by the Bishops. These consecrated the elements of the Eucharist, and from them would commonly be drawn the Episcopate. Such was the original form of the Church. The Ekklesia
The Ekklesia had a body of writing which it preserved for the instruction of its members and the continuity of its doctrine; but it took a long time before these documents were sifted and before a certain proportion of them, a small portion of the whole, were affirmed to have special value as Scripture, that is, inspired and therefore authoritative. There were for instance in the way of records or pretended records of Our Lord’s life and teaching certainly more than fifty such documents, for we have fragments of at least that number.
Only four were admitted to the Canon that is the “regular” or “official” collection. In the same way letters were written by the missionaries of the Early Church, but in the same way only a certain number, under the name of “Epistles,” were admitted to the Canon, and one record of early Apostolic action, the Acts of the Apostles; one apocalyptical work, which we know as the Apocalypse.
This being the sequence whereby the Canon of what we call today the New Testament was gradually formed (by selection over a long space of time); it is exceedingly bad history to pretend that this collection of documents was the authority for the Faith. The authority for the Faith was the tradition of the Apostles; the living agreement of the faithful, especially as represented by their heads in the Apostolic succession. The Bishops.
Apart from this fundamental institution of the hierarchy, the sacred caste which alone had spiritual authority over the Church, there were four other elements which strengthened the new society and helped it to grow. There was the function of intercommunication by travel and by correspondence, along the Imperial roads. All these Churches kept in touch and maintained a common doctrine alive. Councils of Bishops were held (at least, after the Emperors had accepted the Catholic Church and it had become the official religion). They would be summoned to represent the Church throughout the whole world, whence they derived their title, “ecumenical.”
The first of these, under the first Christian Emperor, Constantine, was summoned at Nicea near Constantinople because Constantinople had become the capital of the Empire. It met to discuss and define the full doctrine of Our Lord’s Divinity, and to reject the heretical theses connected with it.
The function of getting into communication by travel and by letter supported and was called into being by the supreme principle of Unity; The idea that the Church was one, its doctrine one, its authority one, stood out vividly in the minds of all its members. From the beginning, dissent was not tolerated; unity was of the essence of the thing, and in connection with this there was present at first more vaguely, later with greater definition, the conception of primacy. One of Our Lord’s Apostles, Peter, was the head of the Apostolic College; his See had a special, if at first less defined, position in Christendom; and Rome, where Peter was last settled, where he and Paul were martyred, became the permanent seat of this primacy as it developed.
The third activity which made for the growing strength of the Church was the use of what we now call Creeds (from the Latin word, “Credo,” “I believe”). They were called in the East where Greek was spoken “symbols,” from the Greek “symbolae,” which means things put together. They were originally called in the Latin-speaking West, “Confessiones.” They arose in order to make sure a new candidate for admission to the Ekklesia was not tainted with heresy. He or she was required before admission to recite truths which had been defined in order that such definition might combat false ideas. These brief recitals did not pretend to cover the Faith; they were not a summary of all, nor even of the principal, belief; for instance, the great creed of the 4th century made no mention of the most important and fundamental mystery of the new society, the Eucharist and the Real presence of Christ therein. Of that doctrine there was ample evidence, going back to the beginning, but as it was not questioned its definition had never entered into these rebutting affirmations which the candidate was required to make.
The forth function making for unity and strength and permanence and growth was, of course that very Eucharist just mentioned. Bread and wine were consecrated after a method, and with words handed down traditionally as those of Our Lord Himself at the Last Supper. The mystic ceremony was performed by the celebrant hierarch, or hierarchs; on its performance the bread and wine over which the mystical formulae had been uttered were belived to be no longer bread and wine but the Body and Blood of Christ Himself.
As St. Justin himself wrote, at a time which was to the Crucifixion as our time is to the Declaration of Independence, and writing as on a matter accepted and long established, writing moreover for the instruction of readers who were not Christian, the bread was no longer “common bread” but “the flesh of Christ.”
All this gives us the external method and machinery whereby the Faith was established and spread with such astonishing success throughout a vast society which had begun by knowing it ill, had proceeded to hate it, and had at last accepted it for a universal religion.
But what was the internal force? How were men convinced? Why did they join this society in spite of the terrible risks communion with it involved? Often it meant ruin of fortune and thrusting out from the society of one’s fellows and sometimes torture and death. What drove men to it? The answer is that the Church was a person which men came to trust as they come to trust it today. A man became a Christian because he found that the Church affirmed things which he recognized to be true in experience and holy in character. It was loved, witnessed to and defended to the death by those who thus felt it to be, when in contact with it, divine, and the only fixed and certain authority of their experience. As for doctrine, they took it from this society of which they had thus become enamored upon such firm grounds. It was not the society which proceeded from the doctrine, but the doctrine that came from the society.
To understand this point, which is fundamental to all comprehension of the Church’s triumph over and penetration throughout the old Roman world, we must also understand the character of the violent resistance which it excited.
As that resistance is too often presented, it seems incomprehensible, because it is represented wrongly. People would not have been thrown to wild beasts, tortured to death, condemned to imprisonment with hard labor in the mines, simply because they preached a general spirit of kindliness, or worshipped a particular ideal Character.
Nothing could have been more tolerant to opinion than the old Graeco-Roman Empire. It is not true that the Empire persecuted the Church because it was a secret society. Mystery societies of various sorts flourished among the citizens; why then did angry instinct for killing this particular one arise?
In some degree, no doubt, for that reason we find hundreds of years before suggested by a Greek philosopher filled with vision. He wrote that if humanity should come across a perfectly good man, his fellowmen would tear him to pieces. Holiness is a reproach. It was also persecuted perhaps because its claims and affirmations upon itself were novel. It said, as nothing else had yet said, “I am the voice of God. You must accept what I say as truth. My code of morals is the path to eternal beatitude, and neglect or denial of them is the path to eternal despair.” That was challenge to all human custom, a sort of challenge not easily to be borne.
Allied to this was the hard, the angular quality of the new thing, with its strict definitions, is Hierarchy, its highly disciplined organization, standing thus as an alien body in the midst of a society that was dissolving. It was an alien thing, and, as it were, indigestible; or rather it was something which had to be accepted altogether or crushed altogether, if there were to be any peace.
But there was a last political reason, and a strong one, for the resistance. As this highly organized definite, enthusiastic body spread, it became more and more a state within a State; it was a society with its own authorities, its own discipline and spirit in the midst of that Imperial World which was inspired by a political desire for peace and unity.  The government of the Empire reacted inevitably and violently against the presence of such an opponent and challenger. It has been noted by many that the Emperors best at government were often the worst persecutors.
This resistance to the spread of the Faith, this compulsion laid upon the Catholic body to fight for its life, was a chief element in its final triumph. Permanent work is done in hard material, “Greek sculpture is not fashioned in butter,” as a just critic said of a minor poet’s verses. The best carving is done in the closest grained wood, and against the grain.
This great united state, which included the whole of the known civilized world. The Graeco-Roman Empire, fell at first gradually then more rapidly into a material decline.
Meanwhile the Church was growing. The framework of the Empire stood; its laws, all its life moved on without a break.
There was no “fall of the Roman Empire”- the phrase is rhetorical and false; but there was a profound change proceeding in the texture of Society. The half-civilized tribes on the fringes of the Empire filtered in more and more into Graeco-Roman society acquired more power and introduced elements of disorder; the ruling class changed and largely lost its culture.
On the material side of life all seemed to be sinking slowly, even while on the spiritual side there was rising to triumph the mighty force of the Catholic Church.
Now since the rise of the one spiritual thing and the fall of the other material thing were coincident, may not they be related as cause and effect?
This is the capital question which we have to deal with on approaching the decline of the Roman Empire in material things. The Empire declined and The Church expanded.
The dates are sufficient proof in this natter. The old pagan civilization was in active decay long before the new small and struggling obscure group of Catholic congregations began to have any appreciable effect. The golden age of literature was passed; letters had become sterile, architecture coarsened, long before the Ekklesia was felt to be a menacing force to the natural Paganism of the Old World. Already old age, corruption, greed, the preponderance of slaves and “Freed-men” side by side with the growth of vast fortunes overshadowing society and throwing it out of balance, had already been at work when the Catholic Church was still so insignificant that it is hardly mentioned by the mass of contemporary writers. There are one or two allusions here and there which have reference to this body, but no more. Only when the Empire was already almost broken down, in the third century, does the Church begin to make strong appeal; and even then its members were as yet but a small minority, even in the East. They were a still smaller minority in the West.
Nor were Christians found in any of the principal palaces of authority; nor possessing power through wealth, still less through office. Tertullian had said at the beginning of the grave social crisis that all might be well if the Caesars could be Christian—but took it for granted that the Caesars could not be Christian.
It is more than a coincidence that the triumph of the Catholic Church came at last coincidently with the restoration of order. The reestablishment of Imperial administration, arms and general obedience in the later part of the third century, with the growing appeal of the Catholic lucidity and discipline, is not fortuitous. The fact that when one man at last became the monarch of the world, Constantine, he also recognized and promoted what was to be the world-religion is not by accident; the two things were the fruit of one spirit running through Society. The Graeco-Roman world not only needed inspiration and vision which had died within it but needed also unity and the principle of certitude without which unity cannot be.
I repeat that central phrase, for it is fundamental to the whole story; so far from the Church causing the decline of Society under which the old Empire slipped into the Dark Ages, the Church saved all that could be saved
The old Roman State, be it remembered, was based on the Army; the Army was its cement, and, one might say, its principle of being.
Lastly, let it be remembered that though we must for the purposes of right history admit the continual material decline going on through those first five centuries during which the Empire turned from Pagan to Christian, the new religion brought with it invaluable compensations for evils which it had not caused, but at the advance of which it had been present.
The Catholic Church brought to the old ruined, dying, despairing Graeco-Roman world the quality of vision. It brought a motive for living and thence there came to it, sustaining all that could be sustained of that grievously weakened world, saner and more stable social arrangements.
The Catholic Church, having become the religion of the Graeco-Roman society, did among other things two capital things for the settlement of Europe on its political side, and for arresting the descent into chaos. It humanized slavery and it strengthened permanent marriage. Very slowly through the centuries, those  two influences were to produce the stable civilization of the Middle Ages, wherein the slave was no longer a slave but a peasant; and everywhere the family was the well-rooted and established unit of Society
To sum up then, by the end of that great period, the first five centuries, extending from the Incarnation to the conversion of Clovis and the establishment of Catholic Gaul, the end of the five centuries during which all our ancestry turned from Paganism to Catholicism and during which the Empire was baptized, were centuries in which we suffered great damage: disorder, barbarism threatening our race, the fall of the arts, of great verse and of high unified administration, the worsening of roads, much loss of the knowledge inherited from the past (Greek, for instance, was dying out in the West, and legend was more and more intermixed with real history). But Europe at that time was spiritually consolidated so that it proved able to meet and overcome the strain to which it was about to be subjected.
That strain would have come anyhow, the violent attack under which Europe nearly broke down, “The Siege of Christendom,” was inevitable. But we survived it. Had it not been for the conversion of the world, we should have gone under.
 

St Benedict | Independent Catholic News

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Monday, July 10, 2017

St Rufina and Secunda | Independent Catholic News

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Sunday, July 9, 2017

Bl. Adrian Fortescue, Roman Catholic English Martyr, he refused to take the Oath of Supremacy supporting Henry VIII' s separation for Rome, Adrian was placed in the Tower of London. Permitted no trial and condemned by Parliament, Adrian was beheaded along with Thomas Dinglay. Feastday July9

Bl. Adrian Fortescue, Roman Catholic English Martyr, he refused to take the Oath of Supremacy supporting Henry VIII' s separation for Rome, Adrian was placed in the Tower of London. Permitted no trial and condemned by Parliament, Adrian was beheaded along with Thomas Dinglay. Feastday July9

Martyrs of Gorkum, A group of nineteen martyrs put to death with great cruelty by Protestant Calvinists in Gorkum, Holland. There were ten Franciscans, two Premonstratensians, a Dominican, a Canon Regular, four secular priests, and one layman in the group. Feastday July 9 Callistus - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Martyrs of Gorkum, A group of nineteen martyrs put to death with great cruelty by Protestant Calvinists in Gorkum, Holland. There were ten Franciscans, two Premonstratensians, a Dominican, a Canon Regular, four secular priests, and one layman in the group. Feastday July 9

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Saturday, July 8, 2017

St Kilian | Independent Catholic News

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Friday, July 7, 2017

St. Humphrey Lawrence, Roman Catholic English Martyr

St. Humphrey Lawrence, Roman Catholic English Martyr. He openly called Queen Elizabeth I a heretic and she had him arrested immediately. He was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Winchester. Feastday July 7

Bl. Ralph Milner, Roman Catholic English Martyr.

Bl. Ralph Milner, Roman Catholic English Martyr. He was arrested the day he received his first Communion. A husbands man by trade, Ralph was allowed a leave from prison and aided priests and Catholics. He was executed at Winchester on July by being hanged, drawn, and quartered for giving assistance to Blessed Roger Dickenson. Feastday July 7

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Thursday, July 6, 2017

Bl. Thomas Alfield, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr.

Bl. Thomas Alfield, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr. While raised as an Anglican, he eventually was converted to Catholicism and left England to study for the priesthood at Douai and Reims, France, receiving ordination in 1581. Returning to England, he was soon arrested while handing out copies of the polemic True and Modest Defence by Dr. Allen. Condemned, he was hanged at Tyburn. Feastday July 6

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Tuesday, July 4, 2017

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Bl. John Carey, Roman Catholic English Martyr, an Irish layman. He was the servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave and was put to death with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Cornelius, and Patrick Salmon at Dorchester in Oxfordshire. Feastday July 4

Bl. John Carey, Roman Catholic English Martyr, an Irish layman. He was the servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave and was put to death with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Cornelius, and Patrick Salmon at Dorchester in Oxfordshire. Feastday July 4

Bl. Edward Fulthrop, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr, he was condemned as a Catholic priest. He was executed at York with three laymen, John Abbot, Thomas Warcop, and William Andleby. Feastday July 4

Bl. Edward Fulthrop, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr, he was condemned as a Catholic priest. He was executed at York with three laymen, John Abbot, Thomas Warcop, and William Andleby. Feastday July 4

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: July 4 Martyrs: Priests and Laymen

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: July 4 Martyrs: Priests and Laymen: Eight martyrs suffered on July 4: four each in 1594 and 1597. These executions are examples of a pattern that only existed during Elizabeth ...

Carmelite Mental Prayer

Contraceptive pills are making fish 'trans' as hormones pollute water su...

Daily Reading for Tuesday, July 4th, 2017 HD

Monday, July 3, 2017

St Thomas | Independent Catholic News

St Thomas | Independent Catholic News: The disciple Thomas is called 'Didymus the Twin' in the New Testament, but throughout the Christian world he is known as 'Doubting T...

Coventry Deanery goes high tech with mobile App | Independent Catholic News

Coventry Deanery goes high tech with mobile App | Independent Catholic News: Coventry Catholic Deanery is probably the first in the country to have its own mobile App!! Its free to download and is compatible w...

Daily Reading for Monday, July 3rd, 2017 HD

Friday, June 30, 2017

How the West Really Lost God: An Interview with Mary Eberstadt - Crisis Magazine

How the West Really Lost God: An Interview with Mary Eberstadt - Crisis Magazine: Editor’s note: This interview of Mary Eberstadt, conducted by Gerald J. Russello, was first published July 21, 2013 in The University Bookman under the title “Faith and Family: A Two Way Street” and is reprinted with permission. Eberstadt is a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington D.C. Q: Thanks for …

The Martyrs of Rome | Independent Catholic News

The Martyrs of Rome | Independent Catholic News: This day commemorates all those who died in the persecutions of Nero in the late first century and always falls after the feast of S...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: An English Civil War Martyr: Blessed Philip Powell...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: An English Civil War Martyr: Blessed Philip Powell...: Blessed Philip Powell  (sometimes spelled Philip Powel) (2 February 1594–30 June 1646) was a lawyer who became a Benedictine monk and priest...

St. Thomas Aquinas' Five Ways as a Path Back to Catholicism

Daily Reading for Friday, June 30th, 2017 HD

Thursday, June 29, 2017

St Peter and Paul | Independent Catholic News

St Peter and Paul | Independent Catholic News: St Peter was in many ways the most impetuous of the apostles. A fisherman in Galilee when he met Jesus for the first time, he was to...

Is Religious Skepticism a Sign of Intelligence? - Crisis Magazine

Is Religious Skepticism a Sign of Intelligence? - Crisis Magazine: I have yet to meet an atheist (and I’ve met and had lengthy conversations with quite a few) who didn’t believe that really smart people (like him) don’t believe in God. It’s a sentiment seemingly supported by various polling data. According to a 2017 Pew survey, belief in God is lower among college-educated individuals than …

Daily Reading for Thursday, June 29th, 2017 HD

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Pope Francis: Deep down - Christian life is so simple | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis: Deep down - Christian life is so simple | Independent Catholic News: Pope Francis yesterday morning told believers not to look to horoscopes or to consult fortune-tellers to foresee the future; but to ...

St Irenaeus | Independent Catholic News

St Irenaeus | Independent Catholic News: Bishop and Martyr. Born around 130 AD, St Irenaeus of Lyons was bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul, (now Lyons) in France. His writings were...

Daily Reading for Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 HD

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Monday, June 26, 2017

Trent Horn: Why Aren't You Catholic? - Catholic Answers Live - 06/26/17

Pope Francis: Don't be afraid to proclaim the Gospel message | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis: Don't be afraid to proclaim the Gospel message | Independent Catholic News: In his Angelus address today, to pilgrims in St Peter's Square, Pope Francis urged Christians not to be afraid to proclaim the Gosp...

St. Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, Roman Catholic Priest founded Opus Dei,

St. Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, Roman Catholic Priest founded Opus Dei, an institution within the Catholic Church dedicated to helping people in all walks of life to follow Christ, to seek holiness in their daily life and grow in love for God and their fellow men and women. In 1930, responding to a new illumination from God, he started Opus Dei's apostolic work with women, making clear that they had the same responsibility as men to serve society and the Church. Feastday: June 26

Daily Reading for Monday, June 26th, 2017 HD

Sunday, June 25, 2017

St Prosper of Reggio | Independent Catholic News

St Prosper of Reggio | Independent Catholic News: This fifth century bishop of Reggio in Italy, is not commemorated in the city's large cathedral, but in a small church tucked behind...

Daily Reading for Sunday, June 25th, 2017 HD

Friday, June 23, 2017

St Etheldreda | Independent Catholic News

St Etheldreda | Independent Catholic News: Nun and foundress. Etheldreda was a seventh century queen, the daughter of Anna, King of East Anglia. In her younger days she had tw...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: The Fortnight for Freedom: St. Thomas Garnet, SJ

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: The Fortnight for Freedom: St. Thomas Garnet, SJ: St. Thomas Garnet, SJ was an alumnus of the seminary in Valladolid, Spain: ST. Thomas GARNET SJ son of Richard Garnet, Confessor of the...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: St. Thomas Garnet: Exile, Return, and Execution

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: St. Thomas Garnet: Exile, Return, and Execution: From the Jesuits in Singapore  website : St. Thomas Garnet was born in 1574 at Southwark, England as the son of an Oxford don. Because Cat...

St. Thomas Garnet, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr,

St. Thomas Garnet, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr, he was offered his life if he would take the oath, but he steadfastly refused, and was executed at the age of 32. Feastday June 23

Thursday, June 22, 2017

St Thomas More and St John Fisher | Independent Catholic News

St Thomas More and St John Fisher | Independent Catholic News: Both saints held high office in England but submitted to martyrdom rather than accept Henry VIII's claim to be head of the Church.

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: The Last Days of St. John Fisher

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: The Last Days of St. John Fisher: Please watch this space for my blog post at the National Catholic Register on St John Fisher--and St. Thomas More--on the anniversary of ...

St. Alban was the first martyr of England, his own country (homeland).. What remained of Alban's relics were scattered in the time of the Dissolution

St. Alban was the first martyr of England, his own country (homeland).. What remained of Alban's relics were scattered in the time of the Dissolution

St. Alban was the first martyr of England, his own country (homeland).. What remained of Alban's relics were scattered in the time of the Dissolution

St. Alban was the first martyr of England, his own country (homeland).. What remained of Alban's relics were scattered in the time of the Dissolution

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

St Alban | Independent Catholic News

St Alban | Independent Catholic News: The first martyr of Britain. Saint Alban was a Romano-Briton, living in Verulamium (now the city of St Albans). During the persecuti...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Five Jesuit Martyrs; Victims of the Popish Plot

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Five Jesuit Martyrs; Victims of the Popish Plot: The Jesuits in Britain  website  gives some background to the Popish Plot, specifically how intra-Catholic conflict contributed to the ant...

Amoris Laetitia and the Four Last Things - Crisis Magazine

Amoris Laetitia and the Four Last Things - Crisis Magazine: Hell—St. Teresa of Avila told her nuns to mentally visit the inferno during life so they would not be imprisoned in it after death. St. John Vianney sighed because the saints, who were so pure, cultivated holy fear while “we, who so often offend the good God—we have no fears.” At last month’s Rome Life …

Roman Catholic Jesuit Martyr of Japan. All burned alive with eight other Christians at Nagasaki Feastday June 20

St. Francis Pacheco, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and Japanese Martyr. Bl. Peter Rinshei, Roman Catholic Jesuit Martyr of Japan Bl. John Baptist Zola, Roman Catholic Jesuit Martyr of Japan. Bl. John Kinsako, Roman Catholic Jesuit Martyr of Japan Bl. Michael Tozo, Roman Catholic Jesuit Martyr of Japan Bl. Paul Shinsuki, Roman Catholic Jesuit Martyr of Japan. All burned alive with eight other Christians at Nagasaki Feastday June 20

Bls. John Fenwick & John Gavan Roman Catholic Jesuit Priests and English Martyrs. They were falsely charged with complicity in the Titus Qates Plot hysteria, and put to death at Tyburn with three Jesuit companions.

Bls. John Fenwick & John Gavan Roman Catholic Jesuit Priests and English Martyrs. They were falsely charged with complicity in the Titus Qates Plot hysteria, and put to death at Tyburn with three Jesuit companions.

St. Vincent Kaun, Roman Catholic Martyr of Japan.

St. Vincent Kaun, Roman Catholic Martyr of Japan. A native of Korea, he was brought to Japan in 1591 as a prisoner of war and was subsequently converted to Christianity. Entering the Jesuits, he studied at the Jesuit seminary of Arima and worked for three decades as a catechist in both Japan and China. Seized during the persecution of the Church, he was burned alive at Nagasaki with Blessed Francis Pacheco. Feastday June 20

Irish Catholic Martyrs

Irish Catholic Martyrs were dozens of people who have been sanctified in varying degrees for dying for their Roman Catholic faith between 1537 and 1714 in Ireland. Feastday June 20

Bl. Thomas Whitbread Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr,

Bl. Thomas Whitbread Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. Feastday June20

Bl. Anthony Turner, Roman Catholic English Martyr, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. Feastday June 20

Bl. Anthony Turner, Roman Catholic English Martyr, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. Feastday June 20

Bl. Conor O’Devany, Roman Catholic Bishop and Irish Martyr

Bl. Conor O’Devany, Roman Catholic Bishop and Irish Martyr. Bishop O'Devany was taken by the English authorities to a scaffold in Dublin to be executed on a trumped-up charge of treason. Having been offered a pardon at his trial if he would deny his faith, he had answered that he was resolved to die in defense of the Catholic faith. On the way to the scaffold, the bishop said to a priest facing martyrdom together with him (Blessed Patrick O'Loughran), "Come, my brave comrade, noble soldier of Christ, let us imitate as best we can the death of him who was led to the slaughter as the sheep before the shearer." As the bishop passed through Dublin's streets, Catholics emerged from their homes to kneel in reverence to their prelate. Following Bishop O'Devany's execution, a paralytic who had crawled to the scaffold to venerate his body was instantaneously cured. Feastday June 20

The Demonic French Revolution

Catholic Martyredom - French revolution - Vendée 1793 - 250,000 Deaths.

Daily Reading for Tuesday, June 20th, 2017 HD

Monday, June 19, 2017

Pope Francis: Memory is essential for faith | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis: Memory is essential for faith | Independent Catholic News: On Sunday evening, Pope Francis celebrated Mass in the Roman Basilica of St John Lateran which was followed by a procession to the B...

Cardinal Vincent Nichols: Pastoral Letter for Corpus Christi 2017 | Independent Catholic News

Cardinal Vincent Nichols: Pastoral Letter for Corpus Christi 2017 | Independent Catholic News: Dear brothers and sisters in Jesus Christ, The words of the Gospel we have just heard contain a remarkable promise: ‘A...

Bl. Thomas Woodhouse, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr.

Bl. Thomas Woodhouse, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr. A resident of Lincolnshire, he received ordination as a secular priest and took up a post there. Forced to resign from this post, he became a tutor in Wales. He was arrested in 1561 for celebrating a Mass and was sent to Fleet Prison. During the period of his incarceration, which lasted twelve years, he entered the Society of Jesus Thomas was tried in 1570. He was hanged at Tyburn. Feastday June 19

Bl. Sebastian Newdigate, Roman Catholic Monk and English Martyr, refused to accept the reforms of King Hemy VIII , Sebastian was executed with Blesseds William Exmew and Humphrey Middlemore,

Bl. Sebastian Newdigate, Roman Catholic Monk and English Martyr, refused to accept the reforms of King Hemy VIII , Sebastian was executed with Blesseds William Exmew and Humphrey Middlemore, condemned to death as traitors, and were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn Feastday June 19

Bl. Humphrey Middlemore, Roman Catholic Monk and English Martyr

Bl. Humphrey Middlemore, Roman Catholic Monk and English Martyr hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. Feastday June 19

Bl. William Exmew, Roman Catholic Monk and English Martyr, refused to accept the reforms of King Hemy VIII , William was executed with Blessed's Sebastian Newdigate and Humphrey Middlemore,

Bl. William Exmew, Roman Catholic Monk and English Martyr, refused to accept the reforms of King Hemy VIII , William was executed with Blessed's Sebastian Newdigate and Humphrey Middlemore, condemned to death as traitors, and were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn . Feastday June 19

Corpus Christi: Church Fathers

A Storm is Coming, Be Not Afraid

The Final Confrontation b/w the Lord & Satan Will be Over Family & Marriage

French Revolution as a Type of End Times Part 1

Corpus Christi: Let the Whole World Tremble

Daily Reading for Monday, June 19th, 2017 HD

Sunday, June 18, 2017

June 18th St Matt Talbot the patron of men and women struggling with alcoholism.

June 18th St Matt Talbot the patron of men and women struggling with alcoholism.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Monday, June 12, 2017

Why the Odds Favor Islam - Crisis Magazine

Why the Odds Favor Islam - Crisis Magazine: On May 22, an Islamic suicide bomber detonated himself outside a pop concert in Manchester, England, killing and wounding dozens, many of them young children. The terrorist was a 22-year-old named Salman Abedi. A few days after the attack, I was reading an article about the mosque he attended—the Didsbury Mosque. “That’s funny,” I thought …

Why Sex Is for the Married Only

Gender Identity Confusion: Those Whom the gods Would Destroy, They First...

Sanctity of Marriage: We Are Left to Battle Paganism On Our Own

Friday, June 9, 2017

How Christians Can Rebuild Our Culture - Crisis Magazine

How Christians Can Rebuild Our Culture - Crisis Magazine: Editor’s note: The following essay is adapted from an address delivered August 6 at the Archdiocese of Toronto’s “Faith in the Public Square” symposium. In the beginning, Genesis tells us, “the earth was without form and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep” (Gen 1:2). Creation begins in chaos. On each day of …

The Future of the West: Christian or Pagan? - Crisis Magazine

The Future of the West: Christian or Pagan? - Crisis Magazine: A friend of mine lives in one of Philadelphia’s comfortable suburbs. She and her husband are both attorneys. Both hold Ivy League degrees. Their community is nearly 90 percent white, rich in Quaker history, above average in education and income, and low in crime. People are friendly. Nights are quiet. Streets are clean and safe. …

Islam: A Christian Heresy Posing as a Post Christian Religion

Idolatry

HERE I AM LORD WITH LYRICS

Daily Reading for Friday, June 9th, 2017 HD

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

St. Peter, Roman Catholic Priest and Spanish Martyr with others

St. Peter, Roman Catholic Priest and Spanish Martyr with Wallabonsus, Sabinian, Wistremundus, Habentius, and Jeremias. They were put to death in Cordoba at the order of Emir Abd al-Rahman II for preaching against Muhammad. Though most were beheaded, Jeremias was scourged to death. Feastday June 7

Daily Reading for Wednesday, June 7th, 2017 HD

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Bl. John Storey, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr,

Bl. John Storey, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr, executed at Tyburn by being hanged, drawn and quartered. Feastday June 1

Pope Francis: Hope carries us forward | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis: Hope carries us forward | Independent Catholic News: Pope Francis continued his catechesis on Christian hope during today's General Audience with thousands of pilgrims gathered in St Pe...

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Why We Should Love the Virgin Mary: Pope Francis Minute

Bl. Margaret Pole, Roman Catholic English Martyr,

Bl. Margaret Pole, Roman Catholic English Martyr, imprisoned in the Tower of London for two years and then beheaded on May 28. She was never given a legal trial and was seventy years old when martyred. Feastday May 28

Friday, May 19, 2017

Bl. Peter Wright, Roman Catholic English Jesuit Martyr, put to death at Tyburn by Oliver Cromwell

Bl. Peter Wright, Roman Catholic English Jesuit Martyr, put to death at Tyburn by Oliver Cromwell

May 19th St Dunstan

May 19th

St Dunstan

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Pope Francis: Each one of us is a story of God's love | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis: Each one of us is a story of God's love | Independent Catholic News: Pope Francis continued his catechesis on Christian hope during his General Audience with pilgrims in St Peter's Square on Wednesday...

St. Elgiva of Shaftesbury, Roman Catholic QueeN

St. Elgiva of Shaftesbury, Roman Catholic Queen and mother of Kings Edwy of the Saxons and Edgar, King of England, and wife of Edmund the First. She gave up public life and became a Benedictine nun at Shaftesbury.

The Fray - Love Don't Die

U2 - Pride (In The Name Of Love)

Robert Palmer - Addicted To Love

McFly - Love Is Easy

McFly - Love Is Easy

The Cure - Friday Im In Love

Righteous Brothers - Lost That Loving Feeling Lyrics

Bon Jovi - Thank You For Loving Me (Lyrics)

The Doors - Love Me Two Times

Foreigner - 'I Want To Know What Love Is' [Official Music Video]

A world without love - Peter and Gordon

The Seekers Love Is Kind Love Is Wine 1968 HD Wide Screen

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Reflections on Love

Reflections on Love: If there is any topic more popular at Catholic Match than the essential differences between male and female, it is the definition and nature of Love. Is love a fancy or a feeling … oops! that's Hartley Coleridge, actually — but certainly the debate is energetic over whether love is a feeling or a decision. …

The Secret of True Love

The Secret of True Love: Is there anything in the modern world about which more has been written and said than about love? The term appears in so many places and in so many fo...

Monday, May 15, 2017

Pope Francis reflects on Fatima | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis reflects on Fatima | Independent Catholic News: Following his pilgrimage to Fatima, Pope Francis said the Regina Coeli on Sunday, took on “a particular significance, imbued with ...

English Historical Fiction Authors: Lordship in the Tenth-century – What was its Polit...

English Historical Fiction Authors: Lordship in the Tenth-century – What was its Polit...: by Annie Whitehead “No man can make himself king, but the people have the choice to select as king whom they please, but after he is con...

Friday, May 12, 2017

Pope: Christians are always on a journey towards God | Independent Catholic News

Pope: Christians are always on a journey towards God | Independent Catholic News: The life of every Christian is a journey and a process of deepening faith, Pope Francis said in his homily during Mass at Casa Santa...

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

The surprising connection between Our Lady of Fatima and Islam | Independent Catholic News

The surprising connection between Our Lady of Fatima and Islam | Independent Catholic News: As we approach the 100th anniversary of the apparitions of Our Lady of Fátima, one aspect that often goes unnoticed is the subtle c...

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization

How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization. author Thomas Woods describes how and why the Catholic church gave Western Civilization some of its most integral and distinctive characteristics.

Ask someone today where Western Civilization originated, and he or she might say Greece or Rome. But what is the ultimate source of Western Civilization?



Bestselling author and professor Thomas E. Woods, Jr. provides the long neglected answer: the Catholic Church.



Gifts such as modern science, free-market economics, art, music, and the idea of human rights come from the Catholic Church, explains Woods. No institution has done more to shape Western civilization than the two-thousand-year-old Catholic Church - and in ways that many of us have forgotten or never known.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

One thousand East Anglia pilgrims walk together at Walsingham | Independent Catholic News

One thousand East Anglia pilgrims walk together at Walsingham | Independent Catholic News: More than 1,000 people joined the annual Diocese of East Anglia pilgrimage to Walsingham on Bank Holiday Monday, May 1.The pi...

Nones prayers to mark 900th anniversary of Merton Priory | Independent Catholic News

Nones prayers to mark 900th anniversary of Merton Priory | Independent Catholic News: A number of churches around the country will be holding special prayer services this week to mark the 900th anniversary of the found...

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Preparation for the Feast of the English Martyrs

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation: Preparation for the Feast of the English Martyrs: Although this Feast is only celebrated in the dioceses of England on the Fourth of May, I always highlight it here and with an interview o...

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Friday, April 28, 2017

Pope Francis: The Christian is a witness of obedience | Independent Catholic News

Pope Francis: The Christian is a witness of obedience | Independent Catholic News: Pope Francis today reflected on the fact that being Christian is not a social status. Speaking during the homily at the Mass in the ...